Marbling Rainbows on Wooden Eggs

Name of Project: Marbled Rainbows

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Samantha Longley and Cora Williams

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 1-4 year olds

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Eleni Leventopoulos

Number of Students: 12 children, accompanied by 1 adult per child


OVERVIEW OF PROJECT

Student will learn a basic marbling technique to make their own rainbow dyed eggs as they learn learn about colour and light.

“BIG IDEAS”/ ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)

When and why do we see rainbows? What colours are rainbows?

STUDENT OUTCOME OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. Learn about nature and the world around them through observation

  2. Use color to create a  rainbow marbled egg

  3. Express creativity through art making


PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Students will need no prior art making knowledge. Any prior rainbow information will be addressed in the nature lesson previous to the art making portion of the day.


LESSON PREPARATION TIMELINE

Before April 2019 - Silverwood instructors outline lesson topics for Green Beans

April 2019 - MCAD TA picks which lesson to shadow and which to teach

April 16 - choose art project

April 23 - outline structure, decide on associated book, choose colouring page, finalize material plan and prep

April 29 - Silverwood preps materials

April 30 - before class: prep shaving cream trays

April 30 - Teaching


EXAMPLES OF ARTWORK

Students are shown an example of a completed project. During the lesson they will watch a live demo of the project.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Story Time book: chosen by Sam, borrowed from library: Peppa Pig and the Easter Rainbow by Candlewick Press

Naturalist lesson about rainbows led by Cora


ASSESSMENT

There is constant feedback of asking students question about what they were taught as well as invitation to share their own experiences. Teachers ask students if they enjoyed the art making that day, why if not, and ask about their favourite part. At the end of the day we ask students what they enjoyed most about the day. After all students have left, teachers meet briefly to discuss how the day went and note adjustments for next week.


MATERIALS

Wood eggs (painted white)

Markers

Shaving cream

Washable paint (red, yellow, blue)

towels (for wiping hands)


LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TIMING

  1. Explore time - participants will play with various puzzles, toys, games, and can do colouring sheets

  2. Clean up - participants help put away explore time materials

  3. Circle time - topic of the day is introduced

  4. Circle time - question of the day: led natualist, question about colour or light, the ‘magic finger’ will point at a participant that then introduces themselves and then answers question

  5. Nature lesson - participants will stay on the rug as Cora leads the nature talk about rainbows

  6. Story time - Teaching Artist reads a story of a related topic

  7. Movement - Classroom instructors lead a movement activity related to the topic

  8. Art time - participants gather on the rug and be shown a finished example of the project. Teaching artist demonstrates step by step

    1. tell students what the project is - paper marbled rainbows!

    2. show finished example

    3. show materials (paper, shaving cream, dye)

    4. first, write name on paper

    5. add some colour to the shaving cream and swirl gently

    6. lay paper on top of shaving cream

    7. peel up and wipe off excess foam

Children take their seats and materials will be passed out

  1. Clean up - hands will be cleaned, papers left to dry

  2. Prep to go outside - put on jackets and boots as needed

  3. Outside time - walk, observe, play a game

  4. Return - head back inside, gather all belongings

TEACHING ARTIST REFLECTION

It will be very helpful, mess wise, to have an accompanying adult ensure that no little one makes too big of a mess. I’ve been in the classroom enough and playing alongside participants and helping out as needed so I don’t think it will be disruptive or jarring to have me lead a lesson.

Stamped Ladybugs

Name of Project: Stamped Ladybugs

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Seth Erlab and Chelsea Novotny

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 4-5 years old

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Eleni Leventopoulos

Number of Students: 12

OVERVIEW OF PROJECT

Students will use a potato to stamp a red circle for the body of their ladybug. They will decorate with a head, legs, and spots in unique an individual manner.

“BIG IDEAS”/ ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)

What make insects different from humans?

Why are insects important to the natural wold?

What is printmaking?

STUDENT OUTCOME OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. Learn about nature and the world around them through observation

  2. Implement their new nature knowledge in a printmaking project

  3. Express creativity through art making

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Students will need no prior art making knowledge. Any prior ladybug information will be taught to students previous to the art making portion of the day.

LESSON PREPARATION TIMELINE

Before April 2019 - Silverwood instructors outline lesson topics for Doodlebugs

April 2019 - MCAD TA picks which lesson to shadow and which to teach

April 16 - Choose art project

April 23 - Outline structure, decide on associated book, choose coloring page, finalize material plan and prep

April 29 - Silverwood preps materials

April 30 - Before class: prep potatoes, inks and brushes

April 30 - Teaching


EXAMPLES OF ARTWORK

Students will be shown an example of a completed project. During the lesson they will watch a short demonstration by the teaching artist.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Story Time book: The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle

Naturalist lesson with live ladybugs led by Seth Erlab

ASSESSMENT

The assessment is simple child centered and take place in the classroom. There is constant feedback of asking students question about what they were taught as well as invitation to share their own experiences. Students are asked if they enjoyed the art making that day, why if not, and ask about their favorite part of the experience. At the end of the day students are asked what they enjoyed most about the day. After all students have left, all teachers meet briefly to discuss how the day went and note adjustments for the next week.

MATERIALS

Small red potatoes cut in half ( sized to fit in childs hand)

Washable paint (red and black)

Markers

White construction paper - 8.5” x 11”

Towels (for wiping hands)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TIMING

  1. Explore time - children play with various puzzles, toys, games, and can do colouring sheets

  2. Clean up - participants help put away explore time materials

  3. Bathroom break

  4. Circle time - topic of the day is introduced, participants are asked about their mood (answer by pointing at a ladybug drawn on the board that matching their emotion, happy, mad, sleepy, etc.)

  5. Circle time - question of the day: where do you go to feel safe? the ‘magic finger’ will point at a participant that then introduces themselves and tells everyone where they go to feel safe

  6. Nature lesson - participants stay on the rug as naturalist shows the live ladybugs and tells about their habitat, what they do for plants and describes the different parts of them

    1. Ladybugs are actually beetles

    2. Ladybugs are brightly colored to warn predators to stay away because they are toxic to some animals, not to humans.

    3. Ladybugs eat aphids and can eat almost 5,000 in their lifetime.

    4. Ladybugs hibernate in groups of adults over the winter

    5. It is a myth that you can tell a ladybug’s age by counting its spots, but it is not true.

    6. Ladybugs can fly when they lift up their wing casings

    7. Ladybugs eat aphids and other insects

    8. Baby ladybugs actually look like tiny alligators and are called larva

  7. Snack time

  8. Story time - while participants eat their snack, read a story of a related topic

  9. Clean up from snack

  10. Art time - participants will gather on the rug and be shown a finished example of the project. teaching artist demonstrates the printmaking technique and project step by step

    1. tell students what the project is - ladybugs stamps made from potatoes

    2. show finished example

    3. show materials (paper, potatoes, paint)

    4. first, write name on paper

    5. take your potato half and dip it in the red paint

    6. stamp as many lady bug bodies as you want (at least two, no more than six)

    7. decorate with the other parts of a ladybug

      1. head

      2. how many legs? (ask students as it is mentioned in the nature talk, students can put as many as they like)

      3. spots!

Children take their seats and materials will be passed out

  1. Clean up - hands cleaned, papers left to dry

  2. Prep to go outside - put on jackets and boots as needed

  3. Outside time - walk, observe ladybugs, play a game

  4. Return - head back inside, gather all belongings

If stamped bodies take too long to dry, stamp bodies, go outside, then come back in and decorate the ladybugs

TEACHING ARTIST REFLECTION

The overall program structure is great and something the participants are used to and responsive to. I’ve been in the classroom enough and playing alongside participants and helping out as needed so I don’t think it will be disruptive or jarring to have me lead a lesson. My biggest concern is, knowing this group of students, that there will be some craziness with the live ladybugs. They are an enthusiastic group and not always the best at following instructions.


Caregiver Card for Mother's Day

Caregiver Card for Mother's Day

Planning Backwards Model*

Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project: Mother’s Day Card 2019

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Expo Elementary School/Ulla

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 1st grade

 MCAD Teaching Artist:  Avery Ellis Nordin

 Number of Students: 24

Visual Arts Content or Standards

 K-3 3. Artistic Process: Perform or Present 1. Perform or present in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations. Visual Arts 0.3.1.5.2 2. Reflect on a presentation based on the feedback of others.

 Overview of Project

 Students receive a small printed booklet with a total of 12 pages (including cover and back).

They fill out the booklet with sentences formed from the questions asked of them by teacher and artist referencing the caretaker in their life. An example would be, “If I could give my ________anything this Mother’s Day it would be…”.

The students practice their writing and sentence structures by placing them within the booklet, as well as creating images to go along with the topic.

After the students have drawn the image of what they want to give their caregivers this Mother’s Day, the teaching artist will scan and make stickers for the students. This will be a physical object that represents what the students want to give their mother this year.

 “Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

What does Mother’s Day mean to you?

How does ‘giving’ feel different than receiveing?

 Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1. Construct sentences aligned with images in the book structure

2. Practice writing, spelling, sentence structure and drawing

3. Create an interactive artwork

 Prior Knowledge

No prior Knowledge is required for this assignment.

Lesson Preparation Timeline

-Gather Materials:

            Medium tabloid paper (11x17) each page can print 1 book

            Markers and or Colored Pencils

            Stapler for binding book together

            (Optional) Scissors, glue, etc. to create collage

-Print and cut out each book

This takes time so set aside an hour or so the day before to prepare materials. Create an examplar.

-Day 1

Spend time with the students, getting them set up so that they understand the project. Have them work on the one page 1st day and have them work on two pages throughout the week until the project is completed.

-Day 2

When I return, the students will have most of the book done, and can start working on the last few pages in class. I will walk around give feedback and see if anyone is struggling with the context.

 As the student comlete the project, gather them in a circle with their books and to share contents with one another.

Examples of Artwork

Examplar that was prepared ahead of time.

Either file may be used for the project as is or to adapt as needed with appropriate software.

Card PDF: (Front Page) (Back Page)

Illustrator File: Cardfile (Change it to whatever you need! from Birthday’s to Father’s Day this will work for any project!)

 Assessment

The quality of the work is in the eye of the beholder. As long as the students personal goal is fulfilled and the teacher feels that the student truly tried we can assess the level of completion.

 Material

Medium tabloid paper (11x17) each page can print 1 book

            Markers and or Colored Pencils

            Stapler for binding book together

            (Optional) Scissors, glue, etc. to create collage

Learning Activities and Timing

 1. Spend time preparing the students for the entire project, giving them materials as well as directions along with open ended questions for the project

2. Take the time to do one on ones with the students and help them create what they have set their minds to.

3. Remind the students on how much time they have left to complete portions of the assignment daily.

4. Take the time to share, tell the students to show off their work to one another.

5. Seal them up inside of an envelope in preparation for sharing on ‘Mother’s Day’

Teaching Artist Reflection

Problems that may arise are that some students might feel as though the work they created isn’t good enough. Keep in mind that they might want to start over. Art making takes failure and persistence as part of the process. Have spare copies of pages and or entire books on standby for this type of issue.

Overall this project will help the students practice sentence structures aligned with visual imagery, brainstorming, and planning ahead by drawing scenes, moments and creating objects/ideas that can be uniquely shared with one another.

This type of work will be shared with the families at home, all of the caregivers receiving this book created by the first graders child will be unique gift for them.


Student Work Shown Below:

Crazy Eyes Project 2019

Crazy Eyes Project 2019

Planning Backwards Model*

Teaching Artist Practice

Name of Project:  Crazy Eyes Project 2019

 School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor:

PERPICH/Cameron Browne/Animation

 Grade Level or Age of Participants: 11th and 12th

 MCAD Teaching Artist:  Avery Ellis Nordin

 Number of Students: 12

 Overview of Project

 Create an experimental animation using only an eyeball as your subject. Students will be taught how to create an eyeball in Adobe Illustrator and then import their assets into Adobe After Effects. Following along with the guidelines the students will learn how to move shape layers along with creating compositions and using effects such as CC Kaleida to create a visually interesting animation.

 “Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

What can I do to create an interesting animation using only one object?

Student Outcome Objectives

 Students will:

1. Create an eyeball shape/ image in Illustrator and import into After Effects

2. Apply new knowledge to new programs

3. Describe how they created the work of art

4. Show how they will continue this kind of work

 Prior Knowledge

 Basics for Adobe After Effects and Adobe Illustrator

 Examples of Artwork

Google doc with tutorial along with my own animation of this project.

 Assessment

With the quality work the students create as well as showing a want to learn more, this alone will show that learned rudimentary skills of each program. A completed project will demonstrate their new knowledge of the program.

 Materials

* Computers with Adobe After Effects and Adobe Illustrator

 Learning Activities and Timing

 1. Introduction/Project break down along with goals for this assignment (10 mins)

2. Illustrator introduction/Eye building (10mins)

3. After Effects introduction/Starting (15 mins)

4. After Effects work time/Follow along (15mins)

5. Work time remainder of class/Critique

 Teaching Artist Reflection

 Confusion with quantity of information is a problem that may arise within the classroom.

 Overall the curriculum of this project works very well, the students get to touch all corners of after effects while being able to learn how to import files from other programs to help expand their ideas of what can be accomplished in the art setting.

 Student work will be uploaded to the Teaching Artist Website, and shared within the community.

 By having a critique afterwards to discuss what was accomplished and what issues had occurred throughout the lesson the students will be able to relate to issues and find solutions to the problems.

If you want to try out this assignment for yourself here is the PDF document I created! Feel free to share with me your final results!

Contact me at averynordin at gmail.com

Student Work Shown Below:

Meander Books

Planning Backwards Model

Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project:  Meander Books

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Urban Arts Academy . Sagirahs Class

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 2nd – 4th

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Kayla Trevino

Number of Students: 10

Overview of Project

Students will design the pages to a meander book. The students will learn how to organize the pages accordingly and folding design. The book will allow for students to practice planning and long term thinking for when it comes to the folding of the pages.

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

-Planning ahead

-Practicing story tell / time line planning

-Learning the that types of books can help what you want to depict

-creative learning as they fill the book before it’s folded

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1. Collectively decide if they want to fold the books first or plan out the concept before.

2. Better skills for planning ahead. Weather or not the book is folded or not when they go to fill it in will still allow them to think about the lay out. The students will have to consider the layout of the subject in the book and how they want their story to be told.

3. The books are no more than 2x2 inches, and the small subject allows for them to work on their fine motor skills.

Prior Knowledge

-Paper folding

-Mountains and valleys

-Use of scissors

-Kiss the corners

-Cautious of materials on the paper

Lesson Preparation Timeline

-brush up on your own making skills

-make examples before class, having  many examples for this group works better and allows for the students to are able to dissect the book when they are unable to figure theirs out on the first try.

-if you need to, prep paper

-gather all materials, scissors, bone folders if you fancy, and any creating mark making materials you plan on using.

Examples of Artwork

-I brought many examples they could look at and examples you would be okay with getting ruined as the students try and figure it all out.

Lei Maier https://scrapgirls.com/all-posts/hybrid-album-tutorial-meander-book

5-copy.jpg
download copy.jpg






Here+Unfolded+Front+View.jpg
Lea_Lume_11.jpg

Lea, Jamie Kubat

https://jamiekubat.com/lea

Additional Resources

I found this publication helpful for brushing up on the technique.

http://www.lib.utah.edu/collections/book-arts/community/Meander%20Book%20Lesson%20Plan.pdf

Assessment

Were the students able to work with the small scale?

Were students able to assemble a book with the directions and examples given?

Did the examples help or cause more confusion?

Did students final work represent their ideas?

If yes how, if no what changed?

Are students happy with the outcome of their books? Did they want to make more?

Materials

-Enough sheets of your chosen paper for the class.

-Paper for first drafts

-Scissors

-Bone folders

-Coloring materials of your choosing.

Learning Activities and Timing

Total of 45 minutes,

  1. 10 minutes - for introduction to the project and directions and looking through examples. Allow students to really look at examples.

  2. 10 minutes- of step by step instructions with the students. Going through all the steps together for our first drafts.

  3. 15  minutes -for the students to work on a final draft of their books. This includes coloring or writing if they chose.

  4. 5-Minutes of clean up.

  5. 5-Minutes of sharing their books and ideas.

TeachING ARtist Reflection

Concerns

- frustration in cutting the meander book.

-the change of layout and the book flips when in the making.

Extended Learning

-once a student learns how to make a book out of 1 sheet of paper they are able to continuously make them.

-Once a student learns they can help other students who may be confused sort out their book.




Accordion Book : 2nd- 4th Grade

Accordion Book : 2nd- 4th Grade

Planning Backwards Model for Urban Arts Academy   

Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project: Making  book / Accordion style book

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor:  Urban Arts Academy, Sagirah Shahid

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 2nd - 4th Grade  

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Kayla Trevino

Number of Students: 10 students

Overview of Project

The students will start with designing the front and back cover for an accordion style book. While the cover are drying the students will use the time to fold the pages  and after both steps are complete the students will attach the pages to the covers with glue. The book will allow for the students to have creative freedom over something that can become personal to them.

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

  • Create something that is their own

  • Being creative with design choice

  • A personal book were they are able to collect their thoughts and ideas

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

  1. Brainstorm ideas for the cover / Design and execute making of the cover

  2. Learn or better skills on collage techniques

  3. Learning page folding


Prior Knowledge

-cut and paper folder

-applying glue

-kiss corners

-Mountains and valleys

Lesson Preparation Timeline

  • Cut down book board

  • Cut down paper, can be done at same time as board but if you are unsure on how much paper you will need you can wait till after first lesson to determine the correct amount.

  • Gather materials for class.


Examples of Artwork

* i also brought in a variation of my own books from my own practice *

Kim kopp

navigations in time

9" x 10.25"

Jody williams

Condensed Creatures

Screen printing and etching

Additional Resources   

How to Make Books: Fold, Cut & Stitch Your Way to a One-of-a-Kind Book by Esther K. Smith

https://www.amazon.com/How-Make-Books-One-Kind/dp/0307353362/ref=sr_1_17?keywords=book+binding&qid=1553582269&s=books&sr=1-17

Assessment

Was the scale good for the students? Were students able to assemble a book with the directions and examples given? Did students final work represent what they wanted when they started the project? If yes how, if no what changed? Are students happy with the outcome of their books?

Materials

  • Two sheets of book board for covers  for each student. Cut into 4x4 inches .

  • Paper that is long enough to fit your desired page amount.

  • Bone Folders

  • Glue sticks

  • Papers and magazines for collage.

Learning Activities and Timing

45 minutes, two days

Day one

  1. 5 minutes - set up materials/ getting space ready for

  2. 5 minutes -  talk with examples and explanation of project

  3. 20 minutes-  the students will used this time to brainstorm, and cut their collages if they’d like. After cutting the materials students glue cover design together on their book boards and set to dry.

  4. 5 minute-  clean up

  5. 5 minute -  share time/ discussion of their design choices.

Day two

  1. 10 minute  - set up, re-introduce and examples again if needed

  2. 25 minutes  - for folding and gluing pages together and any other extra details they might want to add

  3. 5 minutes - clean up

  4. 5 minutes - discussion about the final project. What did the students like/enjoy the most? What would they like to be different?

Teaching Artist Reflection

Concerns - Students may not want to use collage techniques. If they choose not to and only use the 1 sheet to cover everything, finding something to fill the time could come up.

Extended learning - Once a student knows how to make the books they will be able to show others.


Traced Body Self Portraits, Urban Arts Academy Preschool - Beta DeFlorian

Preschool Traced Body Self-Portraits

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Urban Arts Academy, Room 208

Grade Level or Age of Participants: Preschool

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Beta DeFlorian

Number of Students: 15 Students

Visual Arts Content or Standards

(Preschool, State standards do not Apply)

This project is most similar to the following Kindergarten standard:


Subject: 2. Social Studies: Peoples, Cultures, and Change Over Time

Strand: 2. Artistic Process: Create or Make

Standard: 1. Create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations

Arts: Visual Arts

Code: 0.2.1.5.1

Benchmark : 1. Create original two and three-dimensional artworks to express ideas, experiences, or stories.

Curricular Link / Standards

This project, although not applicable to the Minnesota Core Standards, works with ideas of identity, guidance, and possible social studies.

Overview of Project

For this project, students will explore portraiture through physical interaction and critical thinking. Students will start by listening to stories that address characters picking out characteristics they like about themselves – both external and internal. Afterwards, the students will get their bodies traced and then be asked to draw some of their favorite things, their characteristic, and what makes them unique anywhere on the traced body.

“Big Ideas”/ Essential Question(s)

  • How do students perceive themselves/perceive others at such a young age?

  • What sort of physical and internal things related to one’s self do students pick out most?

  • Is it harder or easier for young students to pick out things they like about themselves compared to older students or adults?

  • How does the physicality of tracing the body impact making a self-portrait?

Student Outcome Objectives

 Students will:

  1. Become familiar with the idea of their body as a space, both physical and metaphorical

  2. Understand their Canvas/Cut out body from piece of paper is unique, along with their interests and appearance

  3. Depict their “favorites”: favorite animals, food, color, letter, etc…

  4. Differentiate what makes themselves/each student different and recognize certain similarities

  5. Create an original self-portrait based on their own selections and placement of imagery

Prior Knowledge

How to Use Coloring Tools/Markers or How to Draw (Whatever that may mean to them)

  • Certain Terms: “Favorite”, “Characteristics”, “Appearance/Look”

  • Names of Colors

  • How to use drawing tools

Lesson Preparation Timeline 

April 29th: Gather/Purchase Materials – Buy Paper Roll

May 1st: Touch Base with Mrs. Brown, Solidify Exact Teaching Time

May 2nd: Meet with Lynda, Gather Markers from TA Closet

May 8th: Teach at Urban Arts Academy/Hang Student Work at Urban Arts Academy

Examples of Artwork/References

Additional Resources

  • I Like Myself! by Karen Beaumon

  • What I Like About Me! by Allia Zobel Nolan

Assessment

How will you know that the students learned what you intended and met the student outcome objectives? What will quality work look like?

The Teaching Artist will know students learned what was intended and produced quality work if the students have completed at least two or three images that they associate themselves with. For some students who have a harder time focusing and participating, success might be just tracing their body and including one color they like. Much of the assessment comes from talking with each student and having them explain what they are drawing, since with small students it’s hard to tell, and they can have a harder time staying on task. With such small students, they may be assessed on a person to person basis since they are at different levels of development, and some listen better than others. If students are tackling the project well, assessment may be each student going around and sharing one of their favorites they included or something specific to them, since they enjoy talking in front of the classroom and having the group listen.

Materials

  • Roll of paper for traced bodies ( amount TBD?)

  • Special Markers ( amount TBD?)

  • Scissors (Teacher Use Only)

Learning Activities and Timing

  1. The teacher will read books aloud in front of class on round rug (10 Minutes)

    I Like Myself! by Karen Beaumon

    What I Like About Me! by Allia Zobel Nolan

  2. The teacher will introduce the project verbally at the rug with exemplar to show students what they will be completing (5 Minutes)

    At this time, the teacher will explain to the students how the books they just read correlate with the activity, pointing out examples

  3. Introduce Stations (2 Minutes)

    The teacher will also describe certain stations within the room (the tracing spot, the work spot, and the free play area) and guide students to free time, while both teachers start tracing students and sending students to start working.)

    Direct children to activities/Remind them to be thinking about the project

  4. Allow Students to work on Portraits (20 Minutes)

    Help students get started on project, check in with each student, make sure each student has enough space, etc.

  5. Hang Up Student Work (15 Minutes of Personal Time)

    Hang the self-portraits in the hallways for others to see!

Teaching Artist Reflection

What problems are anticipated with this lesson? 

  • Some students may not want to participate/May not want to be traced

  • Some students might not know what to draw, or how to draw it ( a lot of students asking you to draw it for them)

  • Some students will not listen and be wandering around the classroom

How does this project fit into overall curriculum planning or art experience for the classroom or organization?

This project fits well because Urban Arts Academy is very conscious about using the body in an appropriate and respectful way, this will add onto that idea. Urban Arts really focuses on mindfulness, this will give students the chance to focus on themselves, appreciating what makes them and their friends unique. This activity combines ideas already mentioned in the classroom such as letters of the week, reading circle, and answering and asking questions to fully learn.

How will your students’ work be shared with the larger community?

Student work will be displayed in the Urban Arts Academy hallway where students, faculty, community members, parents etc., are always walking by when they visit. These could potentially be saved for their annual gallery event Urban Arts hosts where student work is on display.

How will you receive feedback on your teaching methodology and quality of student work?

I believe not only the classroom teacher, but the other teachers and even the preschool director at Urban Arts would give me some verbal feedback along with the evaluation Mrs. Brown will be filling out. I also have asked students during other projects how they have liked things by showing me a thumbs up, down, or to the side. That could work for student feedback.

Gallery

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Cross-Stitching Small Objects

Cross-Stitching Small Objects

Planning Backwards Model

Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project: Cross-stitching Objects

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Melodee Strong, Franklin Middle School

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 6th grade

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Eli deVries

Number of Students: 27

Visual Arts Content or Standards

Grades 6-8

2. Artistic Process: Create or Make

1. Create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations. Visual Arts 6.2.1.5.1 1. Create original two- and-three-dimensional artworks in a variety of artistic contexts.

 

Overview of Project

Students will create a 3” cross-stitch using cross-stitch fabric, embroidery DMC floss, and design their own pattern. They will start by choosing an image of their object and translating that to graphing paper, and then transferring the pattern to the fabric. The project will allow for both an introduction and a focus to embroidery and the importance of creating small, intimate work.

 

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

Is craft art?

 

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1. Learn how to pixelate an object using graph paper

2. Learn how to transfer and cross-stitch their design onto fabric

3. Finish their piece and discuss the importance of small works

-focusing on detail/persistence

 

Prior Knowledge

No prior knowledge is necessary.

Examples of Artwork

IMG_1981.jpg

Wone and Youa Vang, Mo Money Mo Problems, cross-stitch, 2018

IMG_1980.jpg

Wone and Youa Vang, (Not) Your Grandmother’s Cross-stitch, mixed-media installation, 2018 – Minnesota Museum of American Art

 

 Rebecca Ballinger, embroidery including cross-stitch, linen and silk, 1830

 

Additional Resources

https://www.waterproofpaper.com/graph-paper/graph-paper-eighth-inch.pdf

Assessment *

Quality work will be finished with even stitching (top stitch facing same direction).

 

Materials

-       14 ct. AIDA cross-stitch cloth, 5 x 5 pieces (9 pieces/packages)

-       DMC embroidery floss

-       3 in. embroidery hoops

-       embroidery needles

-       colored pencils

-       1/8-inch graph paper

-       scissors

-       paper bobbins

 

Learning Activities and Timing

Day 1

  1. Introduce project via powerpoint – 5 min.

  2. Show examplers (with both graph and finished cross-stitch) - 5 min.

  3. Begin and finish creating design for pattern (search for images on ipads if need be) - 40 min.

 

Day 2

  1. Brief reintroduction, overview – 3 min.

  2. Students will pick colors and cut their string. - 5 min.

  3. Show students how to thread their needle and how to begin their cross-stitch – 5 min.

  4. Address questions as they arise during work time – 35 min.

 

Day 3

  1. Continue working on project – 50 min.

 

Day 4

  1. Finish cross-stitch – 30 min.

  2. Discussion – 20 min.

  3. Prepare cross-stitches and install – about an hour

 

Teaching Artist Reflection

 

Problems anticipated:

-       Students may not finish on time

-       Some students may not be engaged because of embroidery/stitching

 

Melodee wanted to include an embroidery project.

Students work will be installed and on view in the school.

Feedback when having discussion about the work.

Experimenting with Yupo Paper for Middle Schoolers

Experimenting with Yupo Paper for Middle Schoolers

Planning Backwards Model*

Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project: Experimenting with Yupo Paper

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Elissa Cedarleaf-Dahl at Justice Page School

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 6-7th grade

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Lin Ajdukiewicz

Number of Students: 35-40

Visual Arts Content or Standards

6.1.2.5.1- Demonstrate the characteristics of the tools, materials and techniques of various two-and-three dimensional media for intentional effects in original artworks.

Overview of Project

Students will use Yupo paper to experiment with abstract watercolor techniques. They will observe the differences between synthetic and non-synthetic paper and use those observations to loosen up their techniques on non-synthetic paper. Without much prior knowledge on how to use watercolor, students may feel timid to let go with the medium and using a paper that allows no control over the medium will loosen the students techniques while they work on abstract pieces.  Can you share why this is important?

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

  • How can we engage with unexpected results in a positive way and see them as productive and positive?

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

  1. Experiment with synthetic paper to create abstract watercolor figures.

  2. Use the experimental and unpredictable techniques that they learned from the synthetic paper to work more loosely and freely on a final watercolor paper design.

Prior Knowledge

Students must know basic watercolor techniques such as, wet on wet, dry on wet, wet on dry and dry brushing techniques.

Examples of Artwork:

Additional Resources

https://paintingdemos.com/painting-with-watercolors-on-yupo-paper-a-few-techniques/

Assessment

The assessment for this project could be a formative assessment where students raise their hand and tell the class one thing that they have learned after using the new type of paper or a portfolio assessment. For the portfolio assessment, students lay out all of their work from the day on their desk and students can speak at their tables about what they made.

It is important for students to see each other’s work since the medium is unpredictable. Seeing others allows the students to figure out what else they can also do with their paper. With the setup of the classroom being in tables, it allows for students to have close access to each other's work.

Materials

  • Yupo Paper (4, 20”x29’’ sheets cut into 5” by 4” rectangles)

  • Watercolors

  • Watercolor Brushes; Flat, sharp, round

  • Water cups

  • Paper to blot brushes

Learning Activities and Timing

  1. I will begin in the front of the class by explaining what Yupo paper is and its qualities. It is key that students understand the difference between synthetic paper and non-synthetic paper. Yupo can be used over and over again, specifically with watercolor, the pigment can be washed off and it will only minorly stain the paper.

  2. The demo video will start and I walk around with my example that I had made in the demo video. Students can feel the paper and see the watercolor techniques that I used.

  3. The video will loop throughout the whole class, with no sound, so that if students need inspiration for techniques they can look up and view the demo video.

  4. Students will retrieve materials and begin to experiment. SInce this lesson is tagged along to another lesson about abstract watercolor creatures, students will attempt to make these creatures on the Yupo paper.

  5. When done with experiments, students will be instructed to move to their watercolor paper final where they will use the skills that they learned from the Yupo paper.




Animating Poetry: 2D Digital Animation Collaboration

Animating Poetry: 2D Digital Animation Collaboration

Planning Backwards Model* Teaching Artist Practicum

Name of Project: Animating Poetry: An Animation Collaboration

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Carmen Elate

Grade Level or Age of Participants: Ages 12-18

MCAD Teaching Artist: Amabelle Johnson 

Number of Students: 8-10

Visual Arts Content or Standards

Grades 9-12 1. Artistic Foundations

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of the arts area.

  2. Media Arts 9.1.1.2.1 1. Analyze how the elements in media arts such as image, sound, space, time, motion and sequence, are combined to communicate meaning in the creation of, presentation of, or response to media arts.

Curricular Link / Standards (if in a classroom only)

11.4.7.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)


Overview of Project

Students will be animating to a 3-4 lined poem about their safe space. Students will animate through an app, FlipaClip, as well as learning three animation techniques (loops, morphing, and rotoscoping).

 

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

  • How is visual art and poetry similar? How can they relate?

  • What can animation teach others?  

  • How does collaboration engage ideas and support work?

  • What is a safe space to you?

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

  1. Write a 3-4 poem based on the theme of safe space (what does that mean to you? What is your safe space?, etc.)

  2. Create a digital animation through FlipAClip based on the student’s written poem.

  3. Learn three animation techniques – Morphing, Looping, Rotoscoping

Prior Knowledge

  • How basic 2D animation is created

  • Know contemporary examples of animation

  • How to create a coherent 3-4 lined poem


Lesson Preparation Timeline 

  • Download FlipAClip onto CRTC IPads

  • Order mesh pens for drawing – Purchase through Amazon

  • Create PowerPoints (Day 1, 2, 3)

  • Create example (poem, sketches, animation, audio)

  • Rehearse presentation

Examples of Artwork

 Day 1: 2D Animation/Animating poetry

Day 2: FlipAClip DEMO

 

Day 3: Technique

  • Loops: Youtube Animators (Sir Fluff, birb.bandit)

  • Morphing: MCAD Valentines Morphing Collab

  • Rotoscoping: Take on Me by A-HA, my examples

 

Assessment

  • We will know that students learned through this lesson when they:

  • Create a 3-4 poem according to the theme (safe space)

  • Finish a complete animation with audio – min: 10 seconds

  • Successfully work together in collaboration (working in groups is encouraged)

  • Problem solve issues in FlipAClip

  • Take this information to make more animations in the future

Materials

  • IPads (provided by CRTC)

  • Mesh tipped iPad touch pens ct.8 (Amazon) - $10


Learning Activities and Timing

Week 1: Intro to Project and Research & Concept

        DAY ONE: Intro to Project (12:30 pm – 2:00pm) (45 min per class)

  • Examples of 2D animation (from Disney to Contemporary) (5 min)

  • Animating Poetry: (To this Day, Troll, Pretty) (5 min)

  • Intro to Project: (5 min)

      • Theme: What is a safe space to you? (5 min)

      • My example: (Poem, sketches, animation, audio.) (5 min)

      • Questions? 

  • Students will start developing a 3-5 lined poem/blurb

 

Day 2: Starting Animation (12:30 pm – 2:00pm) (45 min per class)

  • Brief overview of last lesson (1 min)

  • Intro to FlipaClip DEMO (15 min)

  • Examples

  • Questions?

 

Day 3: Animation Techniques DEMO: Loops, Morphs, Rotoscope (12:30 pm – 2:00pm)

  • Brief overview of last lesson (1 min)

  • Examples/Demo (5 min PER demo = 15 min total)

  • Questions?

  • Students will be developing sketches/drawings


Week 2-3: Continue Working on Poem/Animation

 

Week 4: Adding Audio & Editing

  • Adding audio DEMO (10 min)

  • Troubleshooting animation in time with audio (5 min)

 

Week 5: Presentation!! Friday gathering


Teaching Artist Reflection

Problems I will anticipate is students getting distracted or discouraged from animating. It is a hard medium, so I expect some students might get discouraged. Also, students not knowing where to start is another issue I expect; however, constant encouragement in this community is essential. This fits within the curriculum as the students will be finishing up their stop-motion animation project. They will have prior knowledge on certain animation terminology and how animation is created. They’ll begin learning a new technique!

The students’ work will be shared with a larger community by putting on screening within the CRTC for students and teachers to see.

I will receive feedback through Carmen, Lynda, and my peers.


Sticker Design Planning Backwards_RosasReal_Lizbeth

Name of Project: Designing Your Sticker

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor:  Community of Peace Academy, Ms. Lor, Art

Grade Level or Age of Participants: High school, grades Junior and Seniors, 17-19 years old

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Lizbeth Rosas Real

 Number of Students: 23

Visual Arts Content or Standards:

The MN Art Standards that I will be using is:

1.)   The Anchor Standard number “2. Artistic Process: Create,” “2. Generate and developed original artistic ideas.” Benchmark 5.9.2.2.2: Explore and plan themes, ideas, concepts or styles in preparation for an artwork.”

2.)   The Anchor Standard number “2. Artistic Process: Create,” “4. Revise and complete original artistic work,” Benchmark 5.9.2.4.1 Engage in constructive critique with peers, then reflect on, revise and refine works of art to improve one’s original artistic intent.”

 

Overview of Project

The students will design a small artwork that will be turned into stickers! Their inspiration is from what they enjoy, like, or get inspired.  They will be doing thumbnails, getting feedback, and creating final artwork. The artwork will be scanned and printed on sticker sheets.

 

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s):

  1. What makes ‘it’ “art”?

  2. What can art offer for you? In the present or in the future?

  3. What is art?

 

Student Outcome Objectives:

Students will:

1. Design their stickers.

2. To create thumbnails and scaled sketch(s) before the final design.

3. Identify the design they want to create. Why that design or idea?

4. Have their own stickers.

Prior Knowledge

1.     Definition of Art Elements and Principles

2.     Creativity

3.     Creating thumbnails

4.     Using ink pens

5.     Shading from light to dark, value

Lesson Preparation Timeline

Friday, March 1, 2019

·       Meet Lynda!

·       Get feedback from professor about my planning backwards

Saturday-Monday, March 2-4, 2019

·       Revise the final planning backwards and PowerPoint from feedbacks from Lynda and Ms. Lor

·       Send Ms. Lor and Lynda my final planning sheet and PowerPoint and sheets

Monday-Thursday, March 4-8, 2019

·       Getting the materials ready

Saturday-Sunday, March 9-10, 2019

·       Practice my PowerPoint

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

·       Gather materials together for final check-ins

·       Practice

·       Sleep early!

Thursday, March 14, 2019

·       Teach! Thumbnails and Final Sketch on final paper

Friday, March 15, 2019

·       No School. Conference day!

Monday, March 18, 2019

·       Teach! Inking and if finished early start coloring

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

·       Teach! Adding value and final details.

·       Gather everybody’s final design and worksheets

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

·       Scan everyone’s final design.

·       Print them in sticker sheets

·       Cut them and put them together with their final design and worksheets

·       Grade them for their final grade

Thursday, March 21, 2019

·       Give everything back to them!

Saturday, March 22, 2019

·       Self-Reflection

·       Video Reflection

·       Material Sheet

Examples of Artworks:

 

Example of stickers:

stargirlstickers.jpg

Diane Guzman, Estrella, Digital, 2019

P6.jpg

DeepFriendPaint, N/A, Digital, N/A

stickers.jpg

Andy Valdes, “Welp & Bike More Made in MPLS,” Tradition and Digital, 2018

img009.jpg

Lizbeth Rosas Real, “Cute Ice-Cream,” Color-pencil and Copic Markers, 2019

 

Examples for using color:

default.jpg

Pablo Picasso, “The Tragedy,” Oil on Canvas, 1903

MORISOT-reading-lesson-1981.2-small.jpg

Berthe Morisot, “Reading(la lecture),” 1888

Example for using value:

Screen Shot 2019-03-19 at 2.06.49 AM.png

Snarkytuna, “Long Live the King.” Watercolor and Colorpencil, 2018

 

 

Additional Resources:

  • Etsy

  • Artist from MCAD students( links)

    • Diane Guzman website: https://www.dtheartista.com

    • Andy Valdes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andyvaldesvaldes/

  • Snarkytuna Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/snarkytuna/

  • Pablo Picasso: https://www.nga.gov/features/slideshows/pablo-picasso-the-tragedy.html

  • Berthe Morisot : https://mfastpete.org/obj/reading-la-lecture/

Assessment:

The students will be sharing their sketches/thumbnails before class ends and get feedback on what can be improve, by sharing with a partner that isn’t in the same table but a different table.

When they have finished with their design on the second day, they will do a gallery walk to see everyone’s work and write down what they was successful about everyone and what can be improved.

I will ask for a written reflection and response to the project. What they liked, felt was successful and what could be improved.  

Materials:

1.     Canson, Mixed Media paper

2.     Ink pen like black micro, SAKURA, and Sharpies, and white gel pens

3.     Color Pencils, Prima color pencils

4.     Markers(Optional)

5.     Graphite Pencils

Learning Activities and Timing:

1.     Hand out the assignment and the ‘do-now’ instructions as student enter the room.

2.     If student come in early, ask students to do their ‘do-know.’ 5 minutes when class begins to write things down or finish the list.

3.     Present an overview of the project via the PowerPoint. The student will do 2 thumbnails based on their ‘do-now’ assignment to create a design for their sticker! 5 Minutes. Fast thumbnails. Circle the first choice.

4.     Share thumbnails and their final thumbnail with a partner from a different table to get feedback. 5minutes.

5.     Sketch final design on the good paper and ink it. 20 Minutes.

6.     Clean up. 5 Minutes.

7.     Next day, presenting. 5-10 minutes. Ink and start coloring. 35 Minutes.

8.     Next day, presenting 5 Minutes they will color their design. 35Minutes.

9.     Gallery walk. 5minutes.

10.  Clean up.

11.  Stickers will be scanned and printed in color and given with students with their original artwork and be graded.

 

Teaching Artist Reflection:

1.     I am worried that some students won’t understand this kind of project because they are not use to it. I am worried that the students won’t be able have time in 2 days.

2.     I think this project is helping the students be creative and chose what they want. That is the point of my practice for my teaching.

3.     The students will be sharing their stickers with family or friends because they are getting more than one copy of their design.

How I will receive my teaching methodology and quality of the student work is by asking what I can improve by Ms. Lor and Ms. Claire, another art teacher that was added this year, and students for opinions or improvements when we all go around checking our Design.

Collagraph Printmaking for Middle Schoolers and Highschoolers

Collagraph Printmaking for Middle Schoolers and Highschoolers

Name of Project: Collagraph Printing

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Carmen Elate

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 7th-12th grade

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Lindsay Ajdukiewicz

Number of Students: 20

Visual Arts Content or Standards

9.2.1.5.1. Create a single, complex artwork or multiple artworks to express ideas.

Overview of Project

Students will learn to collagraph print using found objects and cardboard. This style of printmaking is accessible an can be made anywhere so it gives students a new method of creation for expression.  

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

  • How can printmaking be made outside of the traditional printmaking studio?

  • How can printmaking change the way a student thinks about an idea or image?

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1.  Create a collagraph print and plate that demonstrates a place that is real or imagined.

2.  Students will understand the process and steps that go into executing a collagraph  print.

Prior Knowledge:

Students must be able to use shapes to create a picture

Lesson Preparation Timeline:

2/28:

-       Observe at Residency center and further discuss lesson with Carmen Elate.

-       Meet with Lynda Monick-Isenberg about planning backwards model, collect materials from the teaching artist closet.

3/4:

-       Introduce the project and show examples to the class.

-       Hand out plates and materials and have students begin to work on their plates.

3/7:

-       Lynda Monick-Isenberg attends class to observe and help teach the lesson.

-       I will do a printmaking demo with a previously used plate to emphasize how to actually make a print.

3/11:

-       Students will all be printing by this day since they will have time in between lessons to complete their plate.

Examples of Artwork:

FullSizeRender.jpeg
FullSizeRender-1.jpeg

Additional Resources

https://www.handprinted.co.uk/ramblings/collagraph-printing

https://cdn.dick-blick.com/lessonplans/collagraph-printmaking/collagraph-printmaking-collagraph-printmaking.pdf

Assessment

This is a portfolio assessment. I will observe the work in comparison to the actually assignment to view what students understood and what things had been missed after explaining.

Students will caption or title their work to explain their setting that they created for their image.

Materials

  • Brayers

  • Water based black ink

  • Raised paper and fabrics

  • Cardboard plates

  • Retarder

  • Copper plate paper

  • Gloss medium

Learning Activities and Timing

Day 1:

1. Small presentation on what a collagraph print is and also the significance of setting.

2. Students will write down 5 settings that they can think of.

3. Show examples of a collagraph print.

4. Present materials and lets students start building their plates.

Day 2:

1. Will start the day by evaluating where people are with creating their prints, if any students are ready to print. Demo.

2. Demo includes a pre-made plate to create an example, use brayer and ink emphasizing how to know how much ink is enough ink and how to apply ink to the plate.

3. Students who are still creating their plate can do that while students who are printing can begin.

Teaching Artist Reflection

- Prints might come out too light

- Water based ink may dry too quickly creating failed prints.

- Students art will be hung up in the hallway to be seen by all in the residency center.

REINVENT: obstruction-based experimental projects 

REINVENT: obstruction-based experimental projects 

Name of Project: REINVENT: obstruction-based experimental projects 

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Kathryn D’Elia

Grade Level or Age of Participants: High School - Grade 12

MCAD Teaching Artist: Abbey Edmonds

Number of Students: 17

Visual Arts Content or Standards

  • 5.9.2.2.1 5. Visual Arts HS 2. Create 2. Generate and develop original artistic ideas. 1.Collectively or individually apply inquiry methods of observation and research to investigate an idea.

  • 5.9.2.2.2 5. Visual Arts HS 2. Create 2. Generate and develop original artistic ideas. 2. Explore and plan themes, ideas, concepts or styles in preparation for an artwork.

  • 5.9.2.3.1 5. Visual Arts HS 2. Create 3. Create original artistic work. 1. Synthesize visual literacy strategies and conceptual intent to create artwork for a specific purpose.

  • 5.9.2.3.2 5. Visual Arts HS 2. Create 3. Create original artistic work. 2. Balance freedom and ethical responsibility in the use of images, materials, tools, and equipment during art making.

  • 5.9.2.4.1 5. Visual Arts HS 2. Create 4. Revise and complete original artistic work. 1. Engage in constructive critique with peers, then reflect on, revise and refine works of art to improve one's original artistic intent.

  • 5.9.3.6.1 5. Visual Arts HS 3. Present 6. Make artistic choices in order to convey meaning through presentation. 1. Analyze, critique, and justify artwork in an artist statement for a collection or portfolio presentation.

  • 5.9.4.7.1 5. Visual Arts HS 4. Respond 7. Analyze and construct interpretations of artistic work. 1.Construct multiple interpretations of an artwork.

  • 5.9.4.8.2 5. Visual Arts HS 4. Respond 8. Evaluate artistic work by applying criteria. 1. When encountering artwork(s), synthesize one's own evaluation of artwork(s) with a different evaluation of the same artwork(s).

Overview of Project

Students will choose one previous art piece to reinvent through the act of applying a specific set of obstructions. Through the use of a formal, written proposal, students will hold themselves accountable to following their own directions while conceptually and/or technically recreating a piece for critique.

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION

How can limitations encourage experimentation and creativity within students?

 Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1. Display knowledge of terminology and principles/methods of design through a written proposal

2. Apply various techniques to change desired outcome of an artwork

3. Synthesize and analyze the success of process through group critique 

Prior Knowledge

Students will need an existing artwork to reference along with a background of knowledge regarding technique and principles of design.

 

Lesson Preparation Timeline

  • Proposal/Assignment introduction

  • One supervised/guided work week after proposal approval

  • Group Critique

 

Examples of Artwork

  • Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio

Judith Beheading Holofernes

Oil on canvas

57”x77”

1599

  • Artemisia Gentileschi

Judith Slaying Holofernes

Oil on canvas

78.33”x64.13”

1620

  • Various MCAD work from Fall 2016 Operative Drawing

  • Ryan Travis Christian

DUMBER DAYS

7”x10”

graphite on paper

2018

  • Ryan Travis Christian

DIRTY BEACH

7”x10”

graphite on paper

2018

  • Melissa McCracken

Ex-Factor

Oil on canvas

31”x41”

2017

  • Abbey Edmonds

Untitled

Charcoal on paper

36”x48”

2017

  • Abbey Edmonds

Untitled

Charcoal on denril

18”x24”

2017

Assessment

Quality work will be defined in concrete and conceptual terms. The most concrete thing to first assess is whether or not students applied all obstructions to the new work, along with how accurately they applied the obstructions. The goal of this assignment is to break boundaries and encourage experimental growth. The level at which students stray from their comfort zones will be assessed as a mode of effort and ambition. Formal assessment will be taken into account regarding a successful understanding of the principles of design.

 

A group critique centered on student dialogue will be assessed as well to evaluate the students’ understanding of each other’s work. Correct vocabulary and participation will be noted.

 

Materials

Materials will vary depending on each student’s individual proposal. All materials needed can be found in the classroom or brought from home. Specific requests may be subject to purchase.

 

Learning Activities and Timing

1. Day 1: The lesson will be delivered through an image presentation shown at the start of class. There will be specific examples of work shown from diverse periods and in different mediums.

2. Deliver three sets of obstructions from students to choose from.

A:   Must include a 3-dimensional aspect

Create a piece with the opposite meaning/theme/feeling/imagery

Choose a different medium/materials

B:  Create a series (4 or more)

Change your scale by either doubling in size or reducing to half the size

Use a unique tool: no brushes, pens, pencils, crayons, etc.

C:   Reference a historical piece of art in either composition, technique, or narrative/subject matter

Choose a different surface to work on

Use a unique tool: no brushes, pens, pencils, crayons, etc.

 

3. Introduce the written proposal where students will describe the obstructions chosen along with intent for the new project. Instructions are as follows:

Write 1-2 paragraphs:

1)     Describe the piece you are reinventing

2)     List the obstructions that you have chosen

3)     Explain why you have chosen this specific group of obstructions. (There is no right or wrong answer.) Did they seem easier? More difficult? Exciting?

4)     Give a loose description on your intentions with the work. Even in the most experimental work, there are themes and structures. Does this follow a common practice for you? Will it address a problem or other contemporary issues/themes? Is it simply that the act of making is indulgent? Give context so that this experimental work operates within boundaries.

4. The proposals will be submitted for approval before students begin working.

5. Days 2-3: work days

6. Group critique to follow these 5 rules for critique:

1. Immediate Response: What are your immediate responses? These are uncensored, irrational, un-self conscious impressions of the work-what you notice first, what stands out, and how it affects you.

2. Objective Description: Describe the work as if to someone who cannot see it.

3. Formal Complaints and Formal Praise: Look hard at formal matters in the work, including presentation, material choices, composition, draftsmanship, line quality, palette, and placement in space.

4. The Story It Tells: Does the work tell a story? What associations does the work evoke? Is there a title? Try naming the work with a simple noun, then with a phrase.

5. The Work in the World: How does the work connect to the rest of the world, and how does it connect with other works of art?

 

TEACHING ARTIST REFLECTION

A highly anticipated problem is that of frustration. The goal of this lesson is to push students to experiment and operate under restrictions, which may result in polarized reactions of high creativity or a stifled imagination.

 

This lesson capstone’s the end of the semester and capitalizes equally on conceptual and technical skill to prepare students for college-level portfolios and assignments. The written proposal finesses writing skills and clarity when planning future work.

 

An assessment will be conducted both in person and via video recording to assure the lesson was delivered clearly and confidently.

MMiW Screen Printing Workshop with Courtney Cochran

MMiW Screen Printing Workshop with Courtney Cochran

Community members can choose to make a MMIW screen prints on paper, t-shirts or banners at these traveling events. Those who choose to print, learn how to pull a screen and why raising awareness for MISSING AND MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMAN is important.

Self Portraiture and Pattern at MCTC

Self Portraiture and Pattern at MCTC

The elements of drawing — finding pattern and texture. MCAD Teaching Artist Minor/Sculpture Major Zachary North assisting in Gregory Rose’s with Drawing 1 at MCTC.

Negative Combination Workshop at MCTC

Negative Combination Workshop at MCTC

This Photo 1 workshop offers an introduction to photographer Jerry Uelsmann’s photo techniques of darkroom manipulations with negative overlapping to create one image from multiple negatives. Taught at MCTC with MCAD Photo major and Teaching Artist Minor Tom Bierlein.

Fluxus Theater

Fluxus Theater

</Fluxus-Theater > : Fluxus through theatrical performance. Young children perform fluxus art in a theatrical theme as a way to understand performance art and play. Placement: Urban Arts Academy K-2 Afterschool Program with teaching artist Jeralise Tylke.