Name of Project: The Pearl Comic Adaptions

School/Teacher/Classroom or Arts Organization/Mentor: Amber Damm- Clara Barton Open School

Grade Level or Age of Participants: 7th and 8th graders

MCAD Teaching Artist:  Ingrid Jorgensen

Number of Students: 25

Curricular Link / Standards

English:

Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film)

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Visual Arts:

Use foundational knowledge and skills while responding to, creating, and presenting artistic work.

Develop criteria to guide art making to meet an identified goal.

Explore ideas using a contemporary or traditional artistic practice.

Innovate and take risks with ideas, forms, and/or meanings in the process of art making.

Explain how personal preferences and aesthetic choices impact both the creation and perception of artwork.

Justify how contextual information contributes to personal understanding of an artwork

Overview of Project

Students will create a short comic based on a section of John Steinbeck’s The Pearl.  They will have the choice between doing one or two pages, with each page containing six panels.  Certain passages from the book will be suggested/encouraged as source material, but ultimately the scene chosen will be the students’ choice. 

“Big Ideas”/ Essential QUESTION(s)

-What does a successful comic look like?

-How do comics communicate ideas?

-How can one take written language and turn it into visual imagery?

Student Outcome Objectives

Students will:

1. Understand visually descriptive language

2. Translate written language into visual imagery

3. Create a visual narrative of their class reading 

Prior Knowledge

To have read The Pearl  

Lesson Preparation Timeline

-Read The Pearl

-Meet with classroom instructor to discuss lesson possibilities

-Create an example comic

-Review lesson plan with teacher, refine if necessary

-Show students example comic; discuss comics language

-Guide students through their own comic as needed

-Assess teaching and outcomes   

Examples of Artwork

Students will see a comic example adaption of The Pearl that the teaching artist has made.  Each table will have one copy of my example on hand, so the students can easily look back at it for reference.  

Additional Resources 

The Pearl

Assessment

Viewing the students’ work during and after the lesson.

Quality work will look like a finished or sufficiently crafted comics page which shows a comprehensive narrative that’s in the spirit of The Pearl.  

Materials

-Comic page 2x3 templates, printed on nice paper

-Colored pencils

-Pens

Learning Activities and Timing

1. Show my example to the class; ask questions as a way of opening discussion about methods used to create the given scene. (10 minutes)

2. Give students time to create their comics, during which walk around and check-in with the students, ask about their work, make suggestions, answer questions, etc. (25 minutes) 

3. Conclude the lesson; encourage students to show their comics to one another (5 minutes)

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